guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

highlandvalley:

Twitter / Minoru0320: 太陽の顏 (´Д`) …

(Source: celiabasto)

ifphaeiovnpaomfpioaenfaioao

cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

cijithegeek:

youngbertreynolds:

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

(Source: vandalslife)


What’s going on

What’s going on

(Source: cgpjokes)

mashallah-project:

a few hairs by d. marvi
my relationship with my unibrow is tempestuous. some days i hide it away, plucking out each hair with hatred. others, i smooth it down lovingly with rosewater and feed it coconut oil at night to hasten it’s growth. these hairs are one of the many ways i’m navigating my own body while i navigate the liminal space of diaspora. my unibrow evokes both the racial privileged of the homeland and and the racial alienation of the hostland. painting my unibrow gold can be seen as an act of beautification and self-acceptance. conversely, it can be seen as self-orientalization, or, making a prominent physical sign of my racial “otherness” even more so. or, simply, it could be an innocent whimsy. i choose to keep the meaning of this as ambiguous as possible, to mimic my own fluid, love-hate relationship with my unibrow.

mashallah-project:

a few hairs by d. marvi

my relationship with my unibrow is tempestuous. some days i hide it away, plucking out each hair with hatred. others, i smooth it down lovingly with rosewater and feed it coconut oil at night to hasten it’s growth. these hairs are one of the many ways i’m navigating my own body while i navigate the liminal space of diaspora. my unibrow evokes both the racial privileged of the homeland and and the racial alienation of the hostland. painting my unibrow gold can be seen as an act of beautification and self-acceptance. conversely, it can be seen as self-orientalization, or, making a prominent physical sign of my racial “otherness” even more so. or, simply, it could be an innocent whimsy. i choose to keep the meaning of this as ambiguous as possible, to mimic my own fluid, love-hate relationship with my unibrow.

poeticasvisuais:

Jean-Michel Basquiat
Mater, 1982
acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 72 x 84 in.

poeticasvisuais:

Jean-Michel Basquiat

Mater, 1982

acrylic and oilstick on canvas, 72 x 84 in.

magictransistor:

Georges Braque, Vase, Palette, and Mandolin ( Oil, charcoal, graphite on canvas), 1936.

magictransistor:

Georges Braque, Vase, Palette, and Mandolin ( Oil, charcoal, graphite on canvas), 1936.

(Source: sfmoma.org)

lanaturner:

codeinewarrior:

say those three words and i’m yours

the x files

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Valentin Leonida

Heads

Valentin Leonida created the series ‘Heads’ as an attempt to turn our inside world out. With titles such as ‘Melancholia’, ‘Concentration’ or ‘Serpent Mind’, he expresses different emotions in sharp and significant drawings.

The illustrator states: “Humans can make more than 20 distinct facial expressions but the most important thing is to see the expression from inside. I depicted here just 5 expressions. I put some elusive titles to let the viewer to imagine the state of each character.”
More of his works can be found on his Facebook and Valentin Behance.

Website

I love morrissey

I love morrissey

(Source: apple--shampooo)

(Source: lameblogger)

I yield